Street Fashion From

Street fashion from – Fashion magazine contests – Glasses fashion 2011.

Street Fashion From

street fashion from

    street fashion

  • Street fashion is a term used to describe fashion that is considered to have emerged not from studios, but from the grassroots. Street fashion is generally associated with youth culture, and is most often seen in major urban centers.
  • Japan began to emulate Western fashion during the middle of the 19th century. By the beginning of the 21st century it had altered into what is known today as ‘street fashion’.

street fashion from – The London

The London Look: Fashion from Street to Catwalk
The London Look: Fashion from Street to Catwalk
From Savile Row to Carnaby Street, from the bohemian dress of the Oscar Wilde circle in the nineteenth century to the punk street styles of recent years, London has been a significant source of fashion style. This stunning book, a rich and stimulating history of two hundred years of London fashion, explores the circumstances and characteristics that have made the ?London look” distinctive.
Focusing on the design, production, marketing, and consumption of clothing during this period, the authors place these activities in the context of social, cultural, and economic change in the capital. They move chronologically, discussing the rise of the West End as a center of fashionable life; the era of imperial fashion when London dominated the world politically and economically; the increasing democratization of fashionable dress; the challenges and conflicts of modernity; the school of couturiers that emerged midcentury; and the rise of the independent fashion designer and small boutiques. Finally they describe the London punks who, toward the end of the twentieth century, theatricalized the street in a mood of social and sartorial dissent and paved the way for postmodern styles.
Lavishly illustrated, the book draws on photographs of the Museum of London’s remarkable collection of objects and images, and material from the London Institute.

1980s street fashions 13

1980s street fashions 13
Aberdeen 1983
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Olympus OM1 100/2.8
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the street fashion set were some of the first shots I uploaded to Flickr, in few groups but more tags they steadily collect views, mostly I think from teenage girls studying fashion – or curious to see what their mums wore at that age
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this one differs from the others in that I’ve given it a vignette and a bit of treatment, on the others I’ve studiously avoided crushing blacks or blowing highlights (though I don’t disapprove at all of forcing the contrast for artistic reasons)

Street Fashion

Street Fashion
Street Fashion – Street Fashion is about candid street photography showcasing the styles of real people around the world.
We’re not looking for editorial or staged fashion photography. Street Fashion is for photos of what people are really wearing in your hometown. So snap a unique shot of your neighbor, schoolmates, friends, and family and share your take on fashion from the street.

This is what some real eople are wearing here, except the dress is on a mannequuin right now!
street fashion from

street fashion from

Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry
Auction catalogs can tell you a lot about a person—their passions and vanities, peccadilloes and aesthetics; their flush years and lean. Think of the collections of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Truman Capote, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
In Leanne Shapton’s marvelously inventive and invented auction catalog, the 325 lots up for auction are what remain from the relationship between Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris (who aren’t real people, but might as well be). Through photographs of the couple’s personal effects—the usual auction items (jewelry, fine art, and rare furniture) and the seemingly worthless (pajamas, Post-it notes, worn paperbacks)—the story of a failed love affair vividly (and cleverly) emerges. From first meeting to final separation, the progress and rituals of intimacy are revealed through the couple’s accumulated relics and memorabilia. And a love story, in all its tenderness and struggle, emerges from the evidence that has been left behind, laid out for us to appraise and appreciate.
In an earlier work, Was She Pretty?, Shapton, a talented artist and illustrator, subtly explored the seemingly simple yet powerfully complicated nature of sexual jealousy. In Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris—a very different yet equally original book—she invites us to contemplate what is truly valuable, and to consider the art we make of our private lives.

Amazon Best Books of the Month, February 2009: What is love? Artist Leanne Shapton may be the first person to answer this age-old question so persuasively, if not damn-near definitively. Her vision of love–that famously immaterial virtue–finds its best expression in the stuff of our daily lives. Which, of course, may not be as filled with the serendipitous charm that marks the courtship of her fictional lovers, but that doesn’t make Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry feel any less universal. We meet Lenore and Hal after their relationship has ended; that the relics of their life–spent in fits and starts of togetherness–are presented in a Valentine’s Day auction catalog has the potential to strike a bitter chord. What comes across instead is that these items, ranging widely from gifts, postcards, and photos to conspiratorial notes and precious evidence of daily rituals, deserve to be cherished for the love they still so clearly honour. –Anne Bartholomew

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